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Sunburned Eyes? Beware of Snow Blindness!

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Playing outside in a snowy winter wonderland can be magical. Under clear skies in the sunshine, the soft white landscape becomes just about irresistible, whether at home or travelling on a winter-weather get-away. 

Before you let your children run outside to build the most adorable snowman or fling themselves onto the ski slopes, make sure their eyes are well protected. Sun and snow can be a dangerous combination for both the eyes and skin. 

Sunlight Reflected in the Snow

We all know why we need to wear sunglasses and sunscreen in the summer. Winter, however, can be deceiving. It's an illusion to assume that we are safe from sunburns during the colder season. 

Snow acts as a powerful mirror for sunlight and magnifies the effects of UV rays which would otherwise be absorbed by the ground. As a result, the eyes are exposed to both the UV radiation bouncing back from the snowy carpet and the rays shining down directly from the sun. 

If your family is skiing or snowboarding up in the mountains, you need to be even more careful! UV rays are more powerful at higher altitudes. Another important factor to remember is that ultraviolet radiation penetrates through clouds, so even if the sun is hidden behind them, it can still damage your eyes.

Can I Get Sunburned Eyes?

As you may have already guessed, yes —it is possible to get sunburned eyes. The condition is called snow blindness, or photokeratitis. Although most people do not actually experience permanent vision loss, photokeratitis is usually painful, causes extreme sensitivity to light, and can take up to two weeks to fully heal. 

A single day of playing outside in the snow and being exposed to intensive sun glare can be enough to cause snow blindness— though usually with a delay of several hours following sun exposure. What’s worse, if the eyes are repeatedly sunburned there is a risk of long-term damage. 

Symptoms of Snow Blindness

Just like a typical skin sunburn appears only after having been exposed to the sun’s rays, the same is true for the eyes. One sign of overexposure to UV is a stinging or burning sensation in the eyes, or a feeling of having sand in your eyes after a day spent in the snow. 

When eyes are sunburned, they become highly sensitive to light, making it difficult to be outside. Other symptoms include blurred vision, watery eyes, and swollen eyelids. In rare cases, photokeratitis can even cause temporary vision loss, but it doesn't usually last longer than a day or two.

How Do I Protect My Eyes From Sunburn?

Prevent overexposure to sunlight by wearing sunglasses that absorb at least 95% of ultraviolet radiation when you go outside, no matter what time of year it is. An even more effective solution for winter activities is to strap on a pair of well-fitting UV protective sports eyewear, such as ski goggles. Wrap-around styles are ideal because they stay on even when you're active, and block the sun’s rays from entering your eyes from the sides too. 

For winter sports lovers, there are plenty of good reasons to wear protective eyewear, and what works well in sports can be good for play as well. 

How Can I Treat Sunburned Eyes?

It’s after the fact, and you’re suffering from photokeratitis… now what? Give your eyes a rest. 

  • Stay out of the sun for a few days until the symptoms die down. 
  • You may find it comforting to wear sunglasses even when indoors. 
  • For additional relief, place a cool, damp cloth over the closed eyelids while resting.
  • Don’t wear contact lenses until the eyes return to normal. 
  • Artificial tears can help keep the eyes moistened, soothe discomfort and promote healing. However, it's important to consult an eye doctor before running to the pharmacy, since some eye drops are not well-suited for this condition. You can give us a call at 740-204-7272.

Now that you know the risks and precautions to take, you’re all set to enjoy the winter wonderland! Dr. Anna Hopkins at True Vision is happy to help you protect yourself and your family from snow blindness, and offers expert treatment for sunburned eyes. 

To all True Vision patients, customers and friends:

Dr Hopkins and the staff of True Vision want to say thank you for both your patronage and especially your patience during this uncertain time. The AOA and CDC have recommended that we reduce our services to emergencies only for the time being. We will remain available by phone to answer questions, place contact lens orders and schedule appointments for any emergency situations.  Dr. Hopkins is also available by way of FaceTime and Skype for Telemedicine.

Our service hours will be Tuesday and Friday ONLY 10 am-4 pm beginning Tuesday, April 7th until further notice. The office phone number is 740-277-7550 and voicemail is available for any questions or concerns outside of these hours. However, the office is closed to all walk-in traffic.

For our contact lens wearers:

If you need a supply of contacts for the next 2-3 months, we suggest placing an order ASAP as we can not predict how long suppliers will be filling orders. Also, Dr Hopkins will be extending contact lens prescriptions if necessary for 3 additional months without a new exam and fitting on a case by case basis. Lastly, orders of 2 or more boxes can be shipped to you at no additional cost if you prefer.

For our outstanding glasses orders:

You may either pick up your glasses on a drive-by/handoff basis (no adjustments) or we can mail them to you at no additional charge. This is not an ideal way to dispense eyewear but we are trying to follow social distancing guidelines.

We have more detailed information available on our website at drannahopkins.com

Finally, we are so grateful for all of our patients, customers and friends. Dr Hopkins’ ultimate goal for us here at True Vision is to be here for you as long as possible to do whatever we can and to be ready when the smoke eventually clears. Let’s all do what we can for each other by staying home when we’re able, washing our hands and being patient and kind to each other.

Our sincerest thanks,

Dr Anna K Hopkins and the staff at True Vision